Trustees’ Responsibilities and Unit Owners’ Right of Access to Condominium Books and Records in Massachusetts

By Robert Nislick

When a dispute starts to arise between and a unit owner and a board of condominium trustees, the unit owner may ask to review the financial records of the condominium. The unit owner may suspect that the trustees are expending money wastefully or improperly.

What records must the condominium trustees maintain? What rights does the unit owner have to access the books and records of the condominium? How can the condominium trust satisfy its obligations to the unit owner?

Pursuant to G. L. c. 183A, § 10 (c), the organization of unit owners or the condominium’s managing agent shall keep a complete copy of: (1) the master deed, (2) the by-laws, (3) the minute book, to the extent such minutes are kept, and (4) financial records, including and relating to: (i) all receipts and expenditures, invoices and vouchers authorizing payments, receivables, and bank statements, (ii) the replacement reserve fund or any other funds, (iii) audits, reviews, accounting statements, and financial reports relating to the condominium’s finances, (iv) contracts for work to be performed for or services to be provided, and (v) all current insurance policies, or policies which name the organization as insured or obligee. The statute requires that these records be kept in an up-to-date manner within the commonwealth.

Additionally, any unit owner and first mortgagee has a right of reasonable inspection of these records during regular business hours. Access to said records includes the right to photocopy said records at the expense of the person or entity making the request.

If a unit owner requests to inspect the books and records of the condominium, the trustees or the property manager should be willing to set up an appointment for the unit owner to view the records, or photocopy the records and provide them to the unit owner. The association risks getting sued by the unit owner if the trustees fail or refuse to provide reasonable access to these records. Even if it seems like an inconvenience, the condominium association should make every effort to comply with the unit owner’s request in a timely and efficient manner.

About the author: Robert Nislick is a Massachusetts condominium lawyer and former law clerk at the Land Court.   He represents condominium trustees and unit owners. For more information, contact him at (508) 405-1238, or by e-mail.

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